Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Income Taxes

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Income Taxes
3 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2018
Income Tax Disclosure [Abstract]  
Income Taxes
Income Taxes
 
The effective tax rates for the three months ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 were 33.3% and 55.4%. The decrease in the effective tax rate during the three months ended December 31, 2018 was primarily due the impact of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“Tax Act”), partially offset by an increase in reserve for uncertain tax positions. The Tax Act was enacted on December 22, 2017. The majority of the provisions of the Tax Act were to be effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017 (which corresponds to Hillenbrand’s fiscal year ended September 30, 2019). As a non-calendar year end company, certain of the provisions of the Tax Act were effective for us for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2018, while others became effective for our fiscal year ended September 30, 2019. The Tax Act reduced the federal corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%, which became effective on January 1, 2018. The Internal Revenue Code provides that our fiscal year ended September 30, 2018 had a blended U.S. corporate tax rate of 24.5%, which is based on a proration of the applicable tax rates before and after effective date of the Tax Act. The statutory tax rate of 21% applies to fiscal year ending September 30, 2019 and future years. Shortly after the Tax Act was enacted, the SEC staff issued Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118, Income Tax Accounting Implications of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (“SAB 118”), which provides guidance on accounting for the Tax Act’s impact. SAB 118 provides a measurement period, which in no case should extend beyond one year from the Tax Act enactment date, during which a company acting in good faith may complete the accounting for the impacts of the Tax Act under Accounting Standards Codification Topic 740 (“ASC 740”). Per SAB 118, the Company must reflect the income tax effects of the Tax Act in the reporting period in which the accounting under ASC 740 is complete.

In accordance with SAB 118, to the extent that a company’s accounting for certain income tax effects of the Tax Act is incomplete, the company can determine a reasonable estimate for those effects and record a provisional estimate in the financial statements in the first reporting period in which a reasonable estimate can be determined. If a company cannot determine a provisional estimate to be included in the financial statements, the company should continue to apply ASC 740 based on the provisions of the tax laws that were in effect immediately prior to the Tax Act being enacted.

The impact of the federal tax rate reduction under the Tax Act was recognized in the rate applied to earnings for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2018. The reduction for this period was from 35.0% to 24.5%. The further reduction of the federal tax rate to the statutory tax rate of 21% under the Tax Act is to be recognized in the rate applied to earnings for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019.

Furthermore, Hillenbrand is subject to a one-time transition tax on certain unrepatriated earnings of foreign subsidiaries (the “Transition Tax”) as enacted pursuant to the Tax Act. This Transition Tax was imposed on the deferred accumulated earnings of foreign subsidiaries at an effective rate of 15.5% of foreign earnings attributable to cash and cash equivalents, and 8% of the residual foreign earnings. During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2018, we recorded a provisional net expense for the Transition Tax of $24.6. During the quarter ended December 31, 2018, we completed our determination of the effect of the Transition Tax and, pursuant to SAB 118, we recognized a $0.5 increase to the Transition Tax liability, resulting in a Transition Tax liability of $25.1. Hillenbrand elected to pay the Transition Tax over eight years and made the first installment payment of $2.0 during the quarter ended December 31, 2018. The remaining Transition Tax liability is included in other current liabilities ($2.0) and other long-term liabilities ($21.1) in the Consolidated Balance Sheet at December 31, 2018.

In connection with the Tax Act, we evaluated our future cash deployment needs and revised our permanent reinvestment assertions. While we continue to assert permanent reinvestment for the earnings of certain of our foreign subsidiaries, we have recognized an additional $1.3 of deferred tax liability associated with those foreign subsidiaries where we no longer maintain a permanent reinvestment assertion.

As noted above, the enactment dates for many of the provisions within the Tax Act were for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, and as a result, certain provisions were not effective until our current fiscal year ending September 30, 2019. These provisions have been incorporated into the current period tax provision, and include recognizing global intangible low-taxed income and foreign derived intangible income, eliminating U.S. federal income taxes on dividends from foreign subsidiaries, eliminating the domestic production activity deduction, limiting the amount of deductible interest expense, limiting the use of foreign tax credits to reduce the U.S. income tax liability, and limiting the deduction of executive compensation, as well as other provisions.